Filet Mignon

The French word ‘mignon’ translates as ‘dainty’ or ‘cute’ or perhaps ‘delicate’. It is the end of the most tender cut of beef from the beast, being the long, cylindrical muscle that tapers off to a point, two on either side of the rear of the spine just above the pelvis. This cut, known also in French as filet de bœuf, and in English as beef fillet, tenderloin, tournedos, and eye fillet, is the most prized of all cuts and is therefore the most expensive. Delicate and tender, it can be done to a turn in ten minutes but lacks a great deal of flavour, which is why it is often wrapped in prosciutto ham or bacon, and is always served with a rich sauce. The following is a suggestion.

Ingredients.
2 150g – 200g tournedos of beef.
Salt to taste.
4 rashers of American-cut streaky bacon.
100g butter.
4 tblsp olive oil.

Method.
Preheat the oven to 220°C. Cut the tournedos from the centre of the fillet and trim them of any fat or other tissue. Carefully wrap the bacon rashers around the tournedos and secure with three or four wooden toothpicks each. Heat the butter and oil together in a cast iron skillet over a hot flame and sear the tournedos on both sides.
Place the skillet in the oven for 5 minutes, remove, turn the tournedos and replace in the oven for another 5 minutes and remove from the oven. Place some paper kitchen towels on a plate, place the tournedos on the paper, cover loosely with kitchen foil and place in a warm place for 10 minutes. This should cook the meat to a medium to medium rare condition. Adjust the cooking times to suit your personal taste.
Carefully remove the toothpicks, leaving the bacon wrapping in position, and serve with a mushroom cream sauce, or a rich demi-glâce, with roast potatoes and green beans on the side.

Serves: 2.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: